NOVEMBER. Lean Project Management: Processes – Sprint Review / Release Retrospective

Zuloaga ImatgeBlog English, Newsletter, Newsletter 2014Leave a Comment

Sprint-review.release-retrospective-v2

It’s about time we close working cycle times in our LPM project management. In the previous newsletter we described the evolution of sprint progress through the sprint planning and the daily meeting. We have not elaborated on how the release progresses since this is based on the progress of the Sprints that compose it.

To conclude each of the sprints we hold the Sprint Review. This meeting aims to review the sprint just finished: how it went and what has been done, what difficulties have emerged, what went wrong and how to better fix it in the future. The reviews not only help us to know where we are, but especially to learn and improve.

Sprint Review format:

  • Duration: about 2 hours.
  • Attendants: the full team and the product owner.
  • Style: Informal and light, do not use slide show.

Content:

  • The team presents the progress during the sprint.
  • Review and analysis of what tasks could not be finished and the reasons why.
  • Restructuring of the remaining sprints and of the rest of the release.

After executing the last sprint, the closing of a release also requires a meeting itself: the Release Retrospective. This meeting is similar to the Sprint Review but its duration is shorter, since thorough reviews have been done at the end of each sprint. When we arrive at the end of release, we have already done the analysis. The only step left is for the product owner to validate and formalize the end of the release.

Release Retrospective Format:

  • Duration: about 15 minutes.
  • Attendants: the full team and the product owner.
  • Style: Informal and light, do not use slide show.

Content:

  • The team presents the progress during the release.
  • The product owner validates the end of the release.

This systematization provides the feeling of moving forward by closing doors behind us, leaving well-completed stages, and especially agreeing they are actually completed. It is like walking with the feet well adhered to the ground.

We do not get tired of insisting that, in innovation, progressing requires this approach. It is more important to know that we are moving in the right direction rather than pretending we know exactly where we will end.

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